Diazepam Detox & Withdrawal

Diazepam Detox & Withdrawal Symptoms

Diazepam is a central nervous system depressant used for the treatment of anxiety, to manage seizures, muscle spasms and insomnia. It is part of the benzodiazepine family of drugs and has the chemical formula C16H13ClN2O.

It has a sedative effect on the brain and if you reduce your dose or stop taking it, it can cause a host of distressing symptoms. Even though diazepam detox is uncomfortable and even painful at times, it is a necessary process to go through. A medically-assisted detox is the safest way to manage your risks and ensure your safety, and a tapering approach must be followed to manage your withdrawal.

Diazepam Withdrawal Symptoms

Diazepam withdrawal symptoms can last for three to four weeks and they are likely to be more severe if you have used it chronically or for a long period of time. If you have been taking diazepam for longer than two weeks it is likely that you will need to follow a tapering schedule to gradually reduce the amount in your body, as quitting cold turkey is dangerous.

Some of the more commonly experienced withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Restlessness
  • Vomiting
  • Muscle cramps
  • Headaches
  • Confusion
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Tremors
  • Elevated heart rate
  • High blood pressure

Some clients also experience feelings of numbness, dissociation, hypersensitivity and seizures.

Timeline of Withdrawal Symptoms

The half life of diazepam can be up to 48 hours and some people may not experience withdrawal symptoms for up to three days after quitting.

Acute withdrawal
Acute withdrawal usually lasts for one to four days and includes uncomfortable physical symptoms like nausea, vomiting, headaches, cramps and tremors. It also includes cardiovascular symptoms like an elevated heart rate, higher blood pressure and an elevated body temperature. Some people may also experience neurological symptoms such as confusion and seizures. Psychologically, you may experience mood swings, cravings, depression, panic events and rebound anxiety.

General withdrawal
The acute phase is followed by a period of general withdrawal which can last for another 10 to 14 days. During this phase you may experience cravings, lightheadedness, fevers, headaches, chills, nausea, depression and anxiety.
Some people will experience protracted withdrawal symptoms or Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome. These symptoms may last for months after you quit Diazepam and include loss of pleasure, loss of motivation and mood swings.

Long-term withdrawal symptoms

8 to 30 hours after your last dose Mild symptoms are likely to start

36-72 hours after your last dose
Your physical symptoms are likely to be their most intense.

Day five to day eight
Your primary withdrawal symptoms usually subside by this point but it can take some weeks in certain people.

Weeks or months later
Some physical symptoms like greater pain sensitivity and psychological symptoms like depression, sleep disturbances and anxiety may remain.

How to Detox from Diazepam Safely

Diazepam detox should be approached with caution and only attempted under medical supervision, because of the risks it poses to your body and mind. The physical detox can be painful and distressing, and the psychological repercussions are very difficult to manage on your own. The safest approach to detox is through a carefully managed tapering schedule, which gives your brain a chance to adjust to the reduced levels of diazepam.

For some patients it may be necessary to switch medications before tapering can be started. Each patient is completely different and needs to be assessed on admission in order to determine the most appropriate way forward.

Trusting Your Doctors

While you may not feel trusting towards a GP who prescribed you originally, it’s important to recognize that addiction is a disease that requires medical treatment. In order for your GP or private rehab doctor to offer you a high standard of care, you will need to disclose your habits in as much detail as possible. This includes how much and how often you have been using Diazepam as well as whether any other substances were involved. The facts that you can provide will inform your detox program and determine the next steps that are taken.

The medical team that is treating you is non-judgmental and experienced at handling detox and addiction issues and you can rest assured that regardless of how severe your symptoms might be, they are looking after your best interests.

Diazepam Withdrawal Risks

Diazepam withdrawal can take a number of weeks and the symptoms may come and go, and vary in their intensity. Psychologically, there are a number of risks that need to be managed including clinical depression and rebound anxiety which can progress to suicidal thoughts and panic attacks.

Excessive vomiting and diarrhea put you at risk of aspiration or inhaling vomit into your lungs, which can cause choking or pneumonia. Diarrhea and vomiting can lead to dehydration and abnormally high sodium levels in your body, putting you at risk of heart failure. Perhaps the biggest withdrawal risk for diazepam detox is seizures, which are quite common and require medical intervention.

In a Residential Setting

Diazepam withdrawal can take a number of weeks and the symptoms may come and go, and vary in their intensity. Psychologically, there are a number of risks that need to be managed including clinical depression and rebound anxiety which can progress to suicidal thoughts and panic attacks.

Excessive vomiting and diarrhea put you at risk of aspiration or inhaling vomit into your lungs, which can cause choking or pneumonia. Diarrhea and vomiting can lead to dehydration and abnormally high sodium levels in your body, putting you at risk of heart failure. Perhaps the biggest withdrawal risk for diazepam detox is seizures, which are quite common and require medical intervention.

Why Choose United Recovery CA for Diazepam Detox?

United Recovery CA is a group of specialist detox and rehab centers that offers you comprehensive treatment in a luxury setting. We realize that it isn’t always possible for our clients to detox at home so we have created a stable and nurturing environment where you can feel safe and comfortable as you heal and recover. Our experienced clinical team offers dual diagnosis treatment and emotional support through the most trying times of your detox.

Our caring and supportive staff will take care of your general health and wellbeing and support you as you break your physical dependence on Diazepam. Once you have completed detox successfully, you will be able to make a seamless transition into a rehab program so you can address the underlying causes of your addiction.

About United Recovery Project

Why Choose United Recovery CA for Diazepam Detox and Withdrawal?

Our medical detox and rehabilitation center has been designed for comfort and safety. We enable our patients to retreat into a luxurious and non-judgmental space where you receive 24-hour medical supervision and clinical interventions to help you forge your long term recovery path. Once your detox is complete you can enroll for diazepam rehabilitation treatment in a familiar setting as you learn the tools and coping skills required to address the underlying triggers that resulted in your Diazepam dependency. Aftercare, support groups and sober living homes provide you with extended care programs that facilitate long term sobriety in an understanding community.

Leaders in
Addiction Treatment

Recover in a
Luxury Environment

Aftercare &
Lifetime Support

Do You Need Help?

We can help you get better. Together, we can build up your confidence and you can regain control over your life!
Contact us now to ask about our Drug Detoxes now!

Is a Detox Enough to Tackle Addiction?

A detox program is effective at addressing a physical dependence on Diazepam but the factors that contribute to an addiction are complex and part of a longer-term strategy. When you have completed the detox program your body will no longer be dependent on Diazepam to function but you will need some inner resources to cope with challenges and triggers, and this is a process that you will learn in a rehab program.

Without these skills and coping mechanisms in place, you are at risk of relapse later on. Remember that an addiction is known to be a relapsing disease, and it requires constant work in order to manage over the long term. A detox cannot teach you new patterns of thinking or how to change addictive behaviors, it can only help with your physical dependence. It is the first step on your journey to recovery and needs to be complemented by therapeutic interventions like counseling and group therapy.

Learn More About Our Rehab Program

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

I need it for my health, can I really stop using Diazepam?

Even though it might not seem like it right now, a life without diazepam is possible. Depending on what you were taking it for, there are other categories of medication that could be used to treat your symptoms. This decision needs to be made in consultation with a medical professional, who can establish your risk profile and make informed decisions for your overall state of health.

Does my insurance cover Diazepam detox?

Most insurance companies will cover a diazepam detox either partially or in full. The amount of cover that you can claim is subject to the terms and conditions of your insurance policy. We suggest that you enquire about the amount of cover you can get before enrolling, as there may be a co-payment. We can assist you in finding this out should you require it.

What are other names for Diazepam?

Diazepam is sold under prescription under brand names such as Valium and Diastat. On the street it may be referred to as eggs, moggies, jellies or vallies.

Can I get a detox-only program?

We do not recommend a detox-only program because recovery from benzodiazepines is a long term strategy that can take many months. In order to get through it, you need to work on the psycho-emotional factors that contributed to your addiction once you have completed the detox program. Detox is the first step and even though it is painful, it will put you in a stronger position to take on the psychological aspects of your addiction. This takes time and patience and under the guidance of our medical team, we know it can be done.

What are the meds you use during detox?

Diazepam is often used as a substitute medication for some patients who develop addictions to other benzodiazepines and, by the same token, it may be necessary to switch you to another benzo before you can start with a tapering schedule. Some patients may benefit from antidepressant medications while others may need anticonvulsants or muscle relaxants to alleviate dangerous symptoms. Comfort medication is often used for the treatment of nausea, vomiting, cravings and headaches, to make withdrawal more comfortable.

Do You Need Help?

You can get better with the right support. Don’t hesitate to contact us now so that we can discuss the next steps.

Phone